World hothouse with many rooms

World hothouse with many rooms

By Rob Krawczyk 

In this short series, we open out a number of conceptual statements the New Silk Road Project might come to inhabit this summer.

As the philosopher Isabelle Stengers writes: part of the capacity to track a project’s development means understanding its space of “percolation”. So is: as with the meandering histories of thermodynamics, in which a number of descriptions of equilibria and the importance of entropy converged and competed, it is impossible to predict which single research trajectory will prevail. “Connections between concepts, theories and actors may become locally denser until, at some point, a threshold is reached and things begin to “flow”” (Stengers, 2010: 237). ‘It is furthermore all those absent histories, all the questions that weren’t asked or were left unanswered, that delineate the true space of percolation” (Stengers, 2010: 238).

Greening golden fruits in a Golden Era 2.0

Greening golden fruits in a Golden Era 2.0

By Rob Krawcyzk

How London is driving the sustainability of the Belt and Road through pathways and pathfinders to Shanghai 2018

Shanghai 2018

In November, China will host its first ever China International Import Exposition (CIIE) in Shanghai. Under the dazzling lights of the Pudong Bay new Area, aside Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport, 150,000 domestic and foreign purchasers from over 100 countries and regions, will gather to entice the interests of China’s domestic market and a burgeoning middle class which by 2022 is forecast to hold over 550 million people — that is the current population of the US, UK, Germany and France combined.

The BRI is not an invention - it is a structural effect

The BRI is not an invention - it is a structural effect

By Rob Krawczyk

Open Design

In China’s Belt and Road Initiative is neither a strategy, nor a vision. It is a process, published in the EU-Asia at a Glance Series this month, Grzegorz  Stec writes:

Given the global attention received by the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), and its impact on international affairs, it is remarkable how ambiguous the initiative remains. This is hardly astonishing, as Chinese foreign policies tend to strategically focus on general trajectories and leave more elasticity in comparison to Western ones. A reason for the government’s reluctance to attach a specific definition to the BRI is that it continues to evolve.